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Monday, February 22

  1. page home edited ... dubliners and its entirety revolves around the idea of a trapped and corrupt society, yet the …
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    dubliners and its entirety revolves around the idea of a trapped and corrupt society, yet the humbleness and comforts of home, but above all the need to break free. The narrator is the adventurer in all of us. The other characters are the people of Dublin and as much as he despises or shies away from them he knows there is still a great love for them at heart. The narrator is young Dublin. A Dublin full of hope and promise much like the boy in “The Sisters” he is yet able to make decisions free from the pressures of life in Dublin. As the book progresses though we see that hope in the main character fade until finally it fades into “The Dead”. So when we come to the end of the story we see it is almost a preview to the rest of the book, you even may recognize some scenery described later in the book. Is Mahoney a reference to Dublin and the narrator its people or does it represent the remorsefulness every character has for his actions in this story and others. There is no story in which a character has everything together but I think this story speaks of regrets and remind so us to repent something to keep in mind through the whole book. On the less symbolic side of the spectrum we see that the narratordoes not find satisfaction in school or out in the world. His immaturity doesnrt fail to show when he backs down from the adventure that he do sought and maybe wishes for somethin more familiar. Similar to other characters in the story, he is trapped and conformed by Dublin and his desire to be there ,conscious or not, he can not release himself from the fears and insecurities instilled in him.
    Connections w/ other Stories
    There are a few connections in this story the young boy who is also not given a name as in the first story “The Sisters” could be one in the same. Also like in "The Sisters”, "Araby", and "The Dead" the protagonist lacks a mother and father. I wonder if the young boy in the first three chapters in the book could be tied to the older man Gabriel at the end of it. The old perverted man could be made as a connection to the other old learned priests throughout the story who seem to all share a personal guilty flaw. As well as share the same peculiar hobby of whipping boys as Farrington does in counterpart which could be a sign of the never ending cycle of neglect in Dublin over generations. In identical to "Eveline" and "The Litlle Cloud" the narrator has a great desire to go abroad and leave the humdrum behind but is unable to reach that goal.' adventure and escape for him, as for the adult characters of other stories, can never be more than a dream' (peake 18).
    The Word
    The word penitent means to feel or express sorrow for one’s wrongdoing and be disposed to atonement or amendment. A penitent person in the catholic vernacular is a person who confesses sin and admits to a penance. The word is not introduced into the story until the very last sentence but it does so much for the greater meaning of the story. It seems to be a tie to all the events and brings the character’s flaws into the light. I believe that word was used in not only reference to Mahoney but every character need to repent, because at one point or another throughout the story each character exhibited some ungodly behavior.
    Works Consulted
    Peake, C. H, James Joyce: The Citizen and the Artist. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1977.
    "Joyce (Augustine Abysius) Joyce." Twentieth Century Literary Critcism. TCLC 16 ed. gale research company, 1985 MR

    "Araby"
    Setting
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    11:15 am
  2. page home edited ... “An Encounter” Setting As with all stories in Dubliners the story is set in Dublin. What i…
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    “An Encounter”
    Setting
    As with all stories in Dubliners the story is set in Dublin. What is specific to an encounter is the story happens during early summer and takes us all across Dublin. It starts at the young boys’ school or “college” as it is referred to in the story, then makes its way over to canal Bridge. From there the story takes you through the street of Dublin, through markets, and shops, across rivers, and al the way to the fields across town
    Characters
    Narrator- young boy, story is seen mostly from his perspective
    Mahoney-friend of narrator, rambunctious boy that does not seem to follow rules often, accompanies narrator on their “day off’
    Leo Dillon.-friend of narrator and brother to Joe Dillon, chubby ,quiet little fellow that doesn’t show up to the boys day of hooky
    Joe Dillon-friend of narrator and brother to Leo Dillon, the frequent winner of their Indian battle reenactments
    Old man-slight pervert that has and “encounter” with the boys while sitting in a field, also finds an unusual pleasure in whipping little boys
    {http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/02395u.preview.jpg} young irish boys in the early 1900's
    (Young irish boys in the 1900's)

    Plot Overview
    An encounter introduced right after The Sisters is a continuation of the childhood phase of the book. The young narrator, growing tired of the
    monotony and reservations of school and enthralled with tales of wild Indians and loose women, plans a day of hooky with his schoolmates Leo
    Dillon and Mahoney. When Leo does not make an appearance they make fun of him hoping he gets in trouble. Then Mahoney and the narrator
    continue on their journey to the pigeon house taking in the sites of the streets of Dublin and observing the everyday workings of the dock and its
    sailors. They take a ferry across the river and give up the journey to the pigeon house, as to not be caught by their guardians, and end up in a field where they meet a perverse and somewhat creepy old man. The old man seems to have a great interest in the appearance of young girls and the whipping of troublesome young boys. This scares the narrator and when he gets away from the man call Mahoney who seemingly runs to his aid. The narrator then feels sorry for he had always somewhat despised him.

    Deadly Sin[s]
    I recognize two deadly sins in “An Encounter”. The first of which is pride. The young narrator delivers a strong sense of self dependence and superiority over his “counterparts” (a connection to be made later). Throughout the story the narrator looks down at Leo and Mahoney, especially Mahoney exemplified by the wish of the narrator to seem smarter than him by the old man. He lies about his knowledge to impress someone he didn’t even know, a testament to his pride. The old man shows a sense of pride over his extensive collection of literature and his discipline of young boys. Mahoney shares the deadly sin with his pride in his unruliness and character. The second deadly sin I recognized is sloth. Like all the other stories in Dubliners there is a conflict between the characters in their responsibilities in Dublin. The boys fled from the physical and spiritual enrichment of school to enjoy freedoms elsewhere.
    Virtue[s]
    One theological virtue I see throughout this story is hope. In the beginning the narrator has the fresh hope of a new day and his new adventure, exhilarated at the chance to be free of the drollness of his classes. You also see hope his hope in impressing the old man although his presence may have been uncomfortable. Then finally you see hope in the realization that maybe he misjudged Mahoney and his character. The hope that maybe in the call of his name with such a sincere implication of aid, and the promising virtue of charity, was actually heard
    Major Motifs
    One major motif in this story is something I would like to call “flying outside the cage”. The story revolves around the need to be free of the normality and the indulgence in guilty pleasures. I see this in the wild character of Mahoney, the curious and self indulgent behavior of the narrator, and the abnormal confessions of the old man. It is another way that Joyce is representing the loosening of the chains of Dublin and its traditions on its people. Each character is involved in something that is not exactly smiled upon by Dublin’s society. Yet I find it ironic that at the end the author is penitent, as in penitence for one’s sin, like any good catholic they must repent.
    Symbols
    Their does not appear to be many symbols within the story. However the green eyes of the old man could be a reflection of his perverted nature. Besides that simple symbol there is not much to discover between the lines of “An Encounter” as far as symbols are concerned.
    Analysis
    dubliners and its entirety revolves around the idea of a trapped and corrupt society, yet the humbleness and comforts of home, but above all the need to break free. The narrator is the adventurer in all of us. The other characters are the people of Dublin and as much as he despises or shies away from them he knows there is still a great love for them at heart. The narrator is young Dublin. A Dublin full of hope and promise much like the boy in “The Sisters” he is yet able to make decisions free from the pressures of life in Dublin. As the book progresses though we see that hope in the main character fade until finally it fades into “The Dead”. So when we come to the end of the story we see it is almost a preview to the rest of the book, you even may recognize some scenery described later in the book. Is Mahoney a reference to Dublin and the narrator its people or does it represent the remorsefulness every character has for his actions in this story and others. There is no story in which a character has everything together but I think this story speaks of regrets and remind so us to repent something to keep in mind through the whole book. On the less symbolic side of the spectrum we see that the narratordoes not find satisfaction in school or out in the world. His immaturity doesnrt fail to show when he backs down from the adventure that he do sought and maybe wishes for somethin more familiar. Similar to other characters in the story, he is trapped and conformed by Dublin and his desire to be there ,conscious or not, he can not release himself from the fears and insecurities instilled in him.
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Thursday, August 12

  1. page home edited ... {images.jpg} James Joyce, Dubliners All page refere nces references to the Joyce, James…
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    {images.jpg}
    James Joyce, Dubliners
    All page refere ncesreferences to the
    Joyce, James. Dubliners. 1914. Introd. Edna O'Brien. New York: Signet/NAL, 1991. Print.
    "The Sisters"
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Sunday, April 18

  1. page home edited ... Mrs. Mercer- Old garrulous woman who collects used stamps for a religious purpose. She is also…
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    Mrs. Mercer- Old garrulous woman who collects used stamps for a religious purpose. She is also a pawnbroker’s widow and did not like to be out late because night air was bad for her.
    Plot Overview
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    of a bazaar.”bazaar.”(55) In the
    {bazaar2.jpg}
    Deadly Sin[s]
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    angers him. Epifanio San Juan states, "The nature of the boy's response provides a key to our understanding of why the experience in the bazaar should be an inevitable conclusion and the last statement a surprising but probable generalization of the boy's ordeal for himself."(56) The narrator is beyond angry because he thinks his chance at love and a better life outside of Dublin is gone.
    Virtue[s]
    A virtue that is seen throughout “Araby” is hope. The narrator has hope for love and a good future in the beginning of the story. When Mangan’s sister talks to him he gains even more hope and tries to impress her by offering to buy her something at the bazaar. However all hope for love is lost for the narrator when he arrives at the bazaar just before it closes and is unsuccessful at buying Mangan’s sister something.
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  2. page home edited ... "Araby" Setting ... feelings for Mangan’ s Mangan’s sister, and Characters …
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    "Araby"
    Setting
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    feelings for Mangan’ sMangan’s sister, and
    Characters
    Narrator- The young boy who is the protagonist of the story and lives with his aunt and uncle on North Richmond Street. He has a big crush on his friend Mangan’s sister and offers to buy her something at the bazaar because she cannot attend. At the end of the story he is upset because he did not get to buy Mangan’s sister anything and loses hope on love.
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    Mrs. Mercer- Old garrulous woman who collects used stamps for a religious purpose. She is also a pawnbroker’s widow and did not like to be out late because night air was bad for her.
    Plot Overview
    Araby"Araby" is about
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    According to EpiphaniesEpifanio San Juan,
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    a chance with.with her.
    {bazaar2.jpg}
    Deadly Sin[s]
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    A virtue that is seen throughout “Araby” is hope. The narrator has hope for love and a good future in the beginning of the story. When Mangan’s sister talks to him he gains even more hope and tries to impress her by offering to buy her something at the bazaar. However all hope for love is lost for the narrator when he arrives at the bazaar just before it closes and is unsuccessful at buying Mangan’s sister something.
    Major Motifs
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    has hope offor love in
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    in Dublin. When the lights shut off he finally comes to the conclusion that his fantasies of having love will not happen.
    Symbols
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    the book. TheEveryday the narrator looks
    {darkness.jpg} As the lights shut off in the bazaar the narrator realizes that his hope for love is gone and becomes angry.
    Analysis
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    of love. In a matter of seconds with the lights shutting off, the narrator went from loving to angry. He felt the possibility of having a good future outside of dublin was gone.
    Connections w/ other Stories
    “Araby” has many connections with the other stories in “Dubliners”. The first three stories all have evident connections. The narrators are all unnamed young males, who do not have mothers or fathers, and live with their aunts and uncles. “Araby” also connects with “The Sisters” when it comes to the priest. The narrator in “Araby” mentions that a charitable priest was the former tenant of his house and perhaps this priest was Father Flynn from “The Sisters”. Another connection the two stories share is the mentioning of a chalice. In “The Sisters” Father Flynn had dropped the chalice, which was one of the worst things a priest could do. In “Araby” the narrator states, “I imagined that I bore my chalice safely through a throng of foes.” The narrator mentioning this is ironic to the fact that Father Flynn was a priest and dropped his chalice.
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  3. page home edited ... The word is seen throughout “Araby” in many forms. In the beginning of the story the narrator …
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    The word is seen throughout “Araby” in many forms. In the beginning of the story the narrator describes the backyard of having a “Central” apple tree and small straggling bushes. This can be seen as an image of the Garden of Eden. The narrator also had strange prayers and praise throughout the story in which Mangan’s sister came to his mind. Mrs. Mercer was also a very religious woman who collected stamps for some religious purpose.
    Works Consulted
    juaSan Juan, Epifanio. James Joyce and the Craft of Fiction: An Interpretation of Dubliners. Rutherford, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1972.
    [LC]
    “Eveline”
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  4. page home edited ... Connections w/ other Stories "Counterparts" can connect with "Grace". Tom…
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    Connections w/ other Stories
    "Counterparts" can connect with "Grace". Tom, Farrington's faithful son, is thought of when reading "Grace". Farrington's son is similar to Tom Kernan, a man whose drinking habits lead to a horrible accident. Living is the detrimental household of Farrington, he has picked up drinking just as his father. This vicious dogma, continues as we see the cycle move towards offspring.
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    victimizes her tormentertormentor when Kathleen
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    victimizes his tormentertormentor slightly different.
    The Word
    As with "The Sisters" we continue to see paralysis that is inherited in “Counterparts”. The paralysis that results from alcoholism and detrimental behavior plays a major part in this story. Joyce has found a way to undo the constricting bands of the church. If the church cannot simply be done away with, then it must be beaten out. As Farrington strikes blows at Tom, the attempt to do away with the church is clearly seen. The word "tincture" characterizes the entirety of "Counterparts". A tincture is a medicine made by dissolving a drug in alcohol, and as the reader can hardly fail to notice, Farrington's life itself is likewise engulfed. A tincture of a man, his work habits have largely dissipated in the wake of his constant thirst. The word can also mean the colors used in a coat of arms and, as it appears in the text, offers yet another interpretation: "Weathers made them all have just one little tincture at his expense and promised to meet them later on…" Mr. Weathers is British, and his offer of a "tincture" can be seen as a jibe at Irish culture, so great is their alcoholism that it is the recognized national symbol.
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  5. page home edited ... Dublin is the setting of "Counterparts", however, many places within Dublin are iden…
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    Dublin is the setting of "Counterparts", however, many places within Dublin are identified. A law firm where the protagonist works, two pubs (Davy Byrne and the Scotch House), and Shelbourne Road where the protagonist lives.
    Characters
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    Alleyne – Serve's as Farrington’s boss
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    law firm. CharacterizedHe is characterized by is
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    Farrington – He is a copyist
    Miss Delacour – a client of Mr. Alleyne, who witnesses the verbal abuse of Mr. Alleyne dishes to Farrington. Mr. Alleyne seems to have a liking for her.
    O’Halloran, Paddy Leonard, and Nosey Flynn - drinking buddy who travels to the bars with Farrington.
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    Tom - Tom is the obedient son of Farrington. Serves as Farrington’s target for anger release after a long day of frustration.
    Plot Overview
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    the anger from his lifestyle has instilled in him.life.
    Deadly Sin[s]Sin[s
    In "Counterparts", three deadly sins go hand-in-hand: wrath, gluttony, and sloth. Annoyances in Farrington’s life bring about a rage in him that pushes him to drink, only exacerbating his problems. Throughout the workday he finds it hard to concentrate and instead slacks off to visit a pub. "Buffeted by a day of defeats, he pawns his watch and seeks his habitual alcoholic solace, reliving his one triumph of the day" (Ryf, 68). After letting his wrath show in his sudden jibe at Mr. Alleyne, his gluttonous behavior is seen when he visits the pubs and drinks himself into a state of poverty.
    Virtue[s]
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    displeasure in. ThoughThough, Tom does
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    for his fatherfather, even when being ill-treated by his father.ill-treated.
    Major Motifs
    The major motif seen here continues to be the chalice. We see the recurrence of Fr. Flynn's chipped chalice in Farrington's alcoholic tendencies. Instead of using the wine to heal the spirit, he abuses it and finds himself more troubled than before. It serves as Farrington's only refuge, it can be considered his Mass. Just as Fr. Flynn continued with his strangling duties, Farrington loyally persists in his drinking, an attitude to be shared by Mr. Kernan in "Grace".
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